SIZE A A A

Power Wellness Blog

  • Five Things a Physical Therapist Can Do For You

    Posted on 10/24/2018 by NovaCare Rehabilitation and Select Physical Therapy | Comments

    NPTM 2018Every October, the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) hosts National Physical Therapy Month to recognize how physical therapists and physical therapist assistants help restore and improve motion in people's lives.

    This October, the APTA’s focus is once again on the risks of opioid use and that physical therapy is a safe alternative for managing pain. The APTA wants you to #ChoosePT… and so do we!

    According to a recent study, researchers found that patients who started physical therapy within three days of receiving an acute low back pain diagnosis were less likely to use advanced imaging, specialist care and opioids than those who started physical therapy later.1

    In another study, physical therapy as a first treatment strategy resulted in 72 percent fewer costs for the patient within the first year. Patients were less likely to receive surgery and injections, and they made fewer specialists and emergency department visits within a year of primary consultation.2

    You can determine your need for physical therapy and choose which physical therapist you want to help manage your care before seeing a doctor. Whether you have neck pain from sleeping wrong, lower back… MORE >

    Categories: Physical Therapy  

    Backpack Safety Tips

    Posted on 9/26/2018 by Anne Marie Muto, OTR/L, CHT | Comments

    Backpack SafetyNow that students have a few weeks of school under their belts, their backpacks – which were relatively light from a few school supplies – are now filling up. Not only are children feeling the weight of nightly homework, but also the weight of their book, binder and electronic-filled backpacks.

    Aside from considering the right cartoon character/super-hero, color and cool factor, the backpack should also be the right fit. In honor of National School Backpack Awareness Day, here are few things to keep in mind when picking out a backpack:

    The width should be about the same size as the student; the length should be no longer than the torso (trunk or central part of the body) and not hang more than four inches below the waist. Remember to check the bag each year, especially for younger children who are experiencing growth spurts.
  • Select a backpack that has a padded back, two padded shoulder straps and a waist strap to help evenly distribute the weight from the shoulders to the body’s core and hips. The extra padding will help protect students’ neck and shoulders which are rich in blood vessels and nerves and when constricted can cause pain and tingling in the neck, arms, and… MORE >

    Categories: Physical Therapy  

Avoid ACL Injury with dorsaVi Movement Assessments

Posted on 9/11/2018 by Brian Brewer, CPT | Comments

dorsaviSchool is back in session and fall sports are underway! From the gridiron to the soccer field to the volleyball court, athletes of all levels are hitting the field. With increased play, however, there is also an increased risk for injury.

Did you know that there are movement assessments designed to assess ACL injury risk? Within Select Medical’s Outpatient Division*, we provide movement assessments using dorasaVi wireless wearable sensors to measure exactly how individuals move. This technology allows our highly trained clinical team objectively analyze body movement and muscle activation, utilizing a test called the Athletic Movement Index, or AMI. With this testing, we are able to accurately determine an athlete’s ability to safely perform higher level movements, such as cutting, pivoting and deceleration, all of which can lead to ACL injury if not performed efficiently.

The ACL is one of four ligaments in the knee that provide joint stability. Roughly 70 percent of ACL injuries during high-risk sports are non-contact injuries, meaning no collision occurred when the ACL tore. As an athlete begins to tire throughout the course of a game or event, their efficiency in movement begins to suffer, their mechanics… MORE >

Categories: Physical Therapy  

Repetitive Strain in the Upper Extremity

Posted on 8/23/2018 by Marge Krengel, OTR/L, CHT | Comments

Occupational TherapySummer activities often mean more upper extremity injuries associated with overuse, poor posture and unconditioned muscles. In the summer, everyone is excited to get outside and work on gardening, lawn improvement and home repair projects. Others are going back to the gym or taking up sports like tennis and golf.

The terms “wear and tear,” overuse injuries, osteoarthritis and degenerative joint disease have been used in the past to describe these types of injuries. More recently, terms such as repetitive motion injury, repetitive strain injury and cumulative trauma disorder (CTD) are used to define and diagnosis musculoskeletal impairments caused by overuse.

An overuse injury can happen when you try to take on too much physical activity too quickly or when you are causing repetitive trauma to a muscle or joint. For example, if you use poor form as you perform strength training exercises or throw a baseball, you may overload certain muscles and cause an overuse injury.

Certified hand therapists are specifically trained in job and activity analysis and to address CTDs. We have many methods to decrease pain, inflammation and recondition the injured area to tolerate… MORE >

Sedentary Jobs: Reducing the Risk of Injury

Posted on 8/6/2018 by Valerie Hoke, OTR, CHT, COMT, CEAS | Comments

WorkstationIf you were asked to name the biggest injury risk for workers who perform sedentary jobs, what would your answer be? If you are like most people, you would likely answer repetitive motion. However, the actual answer is poor postures. Poor postures include not just your back or sitting posture, but how you hold your arms, where your legs/feet are placed and how your work station relates to you.

The study of ergonomics means fitting the work place to the person. If you look around your work environment, you will notice work areas are set up almost the same. The desk heights, chairs, computer and keyboards are identical. However, if you look at the people, none of us are the same. Even if we are the same height, our body proportions may be different. Let’s review strategies to reduce the risk of injury.

Chair: Review the adjustments the chair may/may not have. Some chairs have only height adjustments, while others may have many adjustments. Start with sitting back in the chair with your back supported against the back rest. Place feet flat on the floor and check that hips and knees are the same height. If not, adjust the chair up/down until they are even or your knees are slightly lower… MORE >

Categories: Physical Therapy   Work Health