Power Wellness Blog

  • Snow Shoveling Safety

    Posted on 3/21/2018 by Dorothy Lehr, DPT, OCS, Cert. MDT | Comments

    Snow ShovelingMajor snowstorms have already hit many parts of the country this winter, and the fourth nor'easter in three weeks is currently battering the East Coast, drowning out any hopes of spring. There is lots of fun to be had with the fluffy white powder, but removing snow from sidewalks and driveways is an unenviable chore and one that can cause a plethora of physical problems.

    With that in mind, below are a few tips and stretches to keep you safe and healthy while out in the winter wonderland:

    Choose an ergonomically correct shovel, one which has a curved handle and an adjustable handle length. As opposed to a straight line shovel, a shovel which is small, lightweight and curved will allow you to carry a manageable load of snow and keep your back straighter, reducing spinal stress.
  • Proper shoveling technique is just as important as the correct shovel. Keep your back straight and bend at your hips and knees. When moving the snow to a new location, avoid twisting your body. Instead, turn your whole body by pivoting your legs. Avoid slipping on slick areas or black ice by wearing shoes or boots with good tread. Applying pet-friendly salt, sand or kitty litter will also increase traction and decrease the risk of slipping. Snow shoveling can… MORE >

    Categories: Physical Therapy  

High School Concussion Management and Rehabilitation

Posted on 3/16/2018 by Stephanie Wilkins, MSEd, ATC, and Leah Friedland, M.S., ATC | Comments

ATC concussionConcussions are a great concern throughout the world of sport and especially in the high school setting. They can impact the student-athlete not only on the field, but also in the classroom and their daily lives. As athletic trainers in the high school setting, when a concussion has occurred, we are involved in the entire process, including:

Baseline testing Evaluation Diagnosis Follow-up Return-to-play

We help with education, implementation of proper concussion protocols and serve as an advocate for the student-athlete in their sport, classroom and life.

Education – Despite the growing awareness and concern that is present in the media over concussions, we find that coaches, parents and athletes are often still uninformed about the seriousness of concussions and the proper way to handle them. A concussion is a traumatic brain injury that is caused by either a direct force/blow to the head or a force transmitted through the body to the head. As high school athletic trainers, we find ourselves explaining to coaches that “getting your bell rung” is the same as sustaining a concussion, and that it is not something that can be ignored. “This wasn’t a big deal back when… MORE >

Categories: Physical Therapy  

Get Moving with a Functional Movement Screen

Posted on 3/8/2018 by Joshua Cramer, DAT, LAT, ATC, CES, CSCS | Comments

FMSInjuries can happen at any time to anyone. Whether playing your favorite sport, working on the job or living your daily life, it’s important to get the proper treatment when an injury occurs, and that starts with the evaluation process.

During an evaluation, a clinician will discuss a patient’s medical history, discuss goals and specific needs, inspect for abnormalities, tenderness or deformities and test musculoskeletal health. All of these components are essential to making a proper diagnosis, but they rarely provide the whole picture. These evaluative techniques focus on the area of the patient’s chief complaint, but what if the issue is in a different region or system in the body?

To design more effective treatments, it is important to look at the body as a whole – the upper and lower body, the front and back of the body and the limbs. This is where postural and functional assessments come into play.

Functional movements are essentials movements found in activities of daily living. They usually involve multi-joint movements in numerous directions, which place demand on the body's core muscles. Our clinical team frequently include functional movement screens in the evaluation process, which are designed to examine these… MORE >

Categories: Physical Therapy  

The NFL Injury Epidemic

Posted on 1/24/2018 by Jeff Lambert-Shemo, ATC | Comments

NFL InjuriesThroughout the 2017 NFL regular season, a plethora of superstars saw their seasons cut short due to serious and season-ending injuries. Carson Wentz, Odell Beckham and J.J. Watt were just a few of the headliners bit by the injury bug. Overall, 35 players who had previously been elected to the Pro Bowl or could be considered major contributors to a team sustained a serious or season-ending injury. Many fans were left wondering whether there were key factors that contributed to this increase in sidelined players.

One possibility lies within an increase in physical abilities of the athletes participating in pro football. While an influx of bigger, stronger and faster players may make for a more exciting product, it also increases the opportunity for injuries to occur. Advances in the field of strength and conditioning along with nutrition have allowed these gladiators of the gridiron to reach new peak performance levels in regards to power and speed. With the difference in speed and strength among players becoming negligible, athletes are now relying on different skills to make an impact for their team.

One of the most important skills for the player is the ability to transfer speed and strength… MORE >

Categories: Physical Therapy  

Parkinson’s Disease and Physical Therapy

Posted on 1/12/2018 by Laila Hasham, P.T., DPT | Comments

LSVT BIGParkinson’s disease is a chronic, progressive movement disorder that affects one in 100 people over the age of 60. While the average age at onset is 60, people have been diagnosed as young as 18. It is the second most common degenerative brain disorder affecting adults (Alzheimer’s disease is the most common). Recent research indicates that at least one million people in the United States and more than five million worldwide have Parkinson’s, and there are around 50,000 new cases diagnosed each year.

Parkinson’s involves the malfunction and death of vital nerve cells in the brain, called neurons. Some of these dying neurons produce dopamine, a chemical that sends signals to the brain to control movement and coordination. As Parkinson’s progresses, the amount of dopamine produced in the brain decreases, leaving a person unable to control movement normally. People with Parkinson’s disease are at risk of falling and sustaining injuries due to their movement and balance impairment.

Treatment includes a combination of medication and physical therapy, and in some cases surgery. A physical therapist who has experience treating Parkinson’s can help a person improve mobility, strength and balance.

The universal benefits… MORE >

Categories: Physical Therapy